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Utensils Used in Japanese Tea Ceremony
Utensils and teaware are an important part of Japanese Tea Ceremony
 Related Resources
• Tea Culture
• Teaware
• Glossary
• Books on Tea Ceremony
 
 From Other Guides
• Photos of a Tea Ceremony
• The Way of Tea in Japan
• Chinese Tea Culture
 

Japanese tea ceremony is a beautiful and intricate ritual that goes far beyond the simple drinking of tea. It can take hours to complete. Much of the detail comes from the precise array of utensils, tools and items involved. Each item has a very specific use. If you are interested in tea ceremony, you should get to know all the tools involved.

Chado - Japanese word for tea ceremony

Chakaiseki - the meal, or food portion of the ceremony

Hashiarai - first course:
Nimono - foods simmered in broth
Kosuimono- clear broth

Hassun - second course:
Uminomono - seafood
Yamanomono - mountain food (land)

Konomono - third course:
Omogashi - main sweet

Koicha - thick tea, made with matcha and served first

Usucha - thin tea, also made with matcha, but with more water. Served second.

Matcha - powdered green tea

Higashi - dry sweets, served at the end of the ceremony

Kama - kettle for heating the water

Futaoki - bamboo rest for kettle lid

Kensui - waste water bowl, for any water leftover when making tea

Kakemono - hanging scroll, to be admired by guests and chosen to represent the theme of the ceremony.

Mizusashi - jar for holding fresh water for tea

Chaire - container to hold tea

Shifuku - silk pouch to hold the chaire

Tana - stand for utensils

Chawan - bowl for actually making the tea

Chasen - whisk, used to whisk the matcha tea, which is served rather foamy

Chashaku - bamboo scoop for tea

Hishaku - bamboo water ladle

Each one of these items has a role in the ceremony. A complete ceremony will include all these mentioned stages, as well as all these tools. Shorter ceremonies may not. Part of the ritual of tea ceremony is the appreciation of the design and beauty of the utensils and decorations of the tea room.

I've just outlined the tool terminology here, you'll need to research further to learn how all of these items are used together throughout the ceremony.


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